If you live in any city in India that has a suburban train network, such as Chennai or Mumbai, you know the pain of waiting in line to book your ticket. Indian Railways has tried various alternatives to avoid long queues, but these are not more convenient than using a smartphone app to book local train tickets. This is the reason why Indian Railways launched the UTS application. UTS stands for unreserved ticketing system and only applies to seats that do not need to be reserved. You cannot reserve unreserved seats on trains outside stations through the UTS app, but it can serve local trains.

The UTS app allows you to book two types of tickets-paper tickets and paperless tickets. Paper tickets require you to book on the UTS app and then print the tickets through ATVM (Automatic Ticket Vending Machine), which is available in more than 1,000 stations in India. On the other hand, paperless tickets available in certain cities can be booked on the UTS app, and you don’t need to print them.

Things to remember before booking paperless tickets on the UTS app

Before booking tickets on the UTS app, there are a few things you need to keep in mind.

  • You can book paperless tickets in the following cities through the UTS app-Chennai, Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai and the Twin Cities.
  • You need to book paperless tickets within 2 kilometers of the source site. UTS application requires location access book ticket.
  • You cannot book a paperless ticket while standing on a railroad track or in a train. Sometimes this works for us because GPS is not completely accurate, but in most cases, the app does not allow you to book tickets while in the train.
  • Paperless tickets can be accessed offline. You can display these to the ticket inspector through the UTS app.
  • If your phone battery is dead, then the ticket booked on the UTS app is useless. Therefore, remember to charge your phone before travelling on a suburban train.
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Book paper tickets via UTS app?Remember these things

You can book paper tickets through the UTS app, but you should understand these first.

  • You can book paper tickets without giving the UTS app access to your phone’s location.
  • You need to print the ticket at the ATVM booth at the train station.
  • If you do not print a paper ticket booked through the UTS application, you may be fined.
  • The ink on tickets printed at ticket booths tends to fade quickly, so we strongly recommend that you do not book printed season tickets through the UTS app.
  • Many ATVM kiosks at the train station are unavailable, so you don’t want to get into trouble if you can’t print your tickets.

How to download the UTS app and register to book local train tickets

You can download UTS apps on Android, iPhone and Windows Phone.

Please follow the steps below to create an account through the UTS app.

  1. Open the UTS app on your smartphone and click Three vertical points Icon in the upper right corner and click register.Or, you can visit the UTS website and click registered.
  2. Enter your mobile number, name, password, gender, and then check the box indicating that you accept the terms and conditions.then click Enter all information.
  3. Now you will receive an OTP (One Time Password) via SMS.Enter the four-digit OTP and click submit.

This will complete the registration process on the UTS application.

How to book paperless tickets for local trains on the UTS app

Please follow the steps below to book paperless tickets on the UTS app.

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  1. Open the UTS app on Android or iPhone.
  2. If you are not logged in, click log in The button in the upper right corner.The button looks like a Rectangle with right arrow On the iPhone.
  3. Enter your credentials, log in, and click Booking.
  4. Tap Ordinary book.
  5. select Booking and travel Tab at the top and click carry on.
  6. under From the station Select the station you want to book. Remember, you should be less than 2 kilometers away from the source station. If your distance is more than 2 kilometers, the UTS app will not allow you to book paperless tickets.
  7. under To the station, Select a destination.
  8. Tap carry on.
  9. On the next screen, there are multiple options-number of passengers, one-way or return tickets, first or second class, AC or non-AC train, and finally the payment gateway (R-Wallet or other payment gateway).Select these according to your requirements and click Get fare.
  10. Now check all the details once, when ready, click Booking.
  11. This will redirect you to R-Wallet or payment gateway where you can complete the payment.
  12. Now you will see the ticket in the application.In case you can’t see it, click Home Icon in the upper right corner and click Booking history Look at the ticket.

uts android app tickets UTS

Even without internet, you can check the ticket or show it to the ticket checker on the train.​​​

For more tutorials, please visit our methods section.

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Jose
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Yousuf Jawed is a video shooter and video editor for Advertisement Shout in Mumbai. He is responsible for making the product look good on the camera, whether it is photos or videos. Yousef is always interested in new camera technologies and applications in order to better manage his daily work. You can find him on Twitter (@you_sufism) and his email on yousufj@Advertisement Shout.com, so please send your clues and tips.
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