Assisted driving systems installed in Tesla, Hyundai and Subaru vehicles failed to avoid frontal crashes in tests conducted by AAA.

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The driver-assist systems installed in Tesla, Hyundai and Subaru vehicles failed to avoid a frontal collision in tests conducted by AAA, although Tesla’s Autopilot did hit an oncoming model of a car Slow down the vehicle to walking speed.

AAA, a U.S. consumer and travel services group, said the tests illustrate how assisted driving and automatic braking systems fail to true self-driving and require the driver to maintain control of the vehicle.

An increasing number of new cars are equipped with automated driver assistance systems (ADAS) that partially automate functions such as steering, lane keeping and braking. Tesla’s Autopilot is one of the best-known such systems, but most major automakers offer similar technology. Regulators, auto insurers and automakers have warned that ADAS systems cannot safely replace the undivided attention of human drivers.

In their latest study of the limitations of assisted driving technology, AAA researchers set up four scenarios for three test models: a fake car driving in the same direction as the test vehicle; a fake cyclist driving in the same direction; Encounter a fake car on the head-on crash route at 25 mph; and avoid the simulated cyclist’s path through the test car.

AAA said all three test vehicles detected and avoided hitting virtual vehicles and cyclists traveling in the same direction in front of the test vehicle.

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But the AAA said the Hyundai Santa Fe and Subaru Forester did not appear to detect or slow down during a simulated frontal collision to avoid a collision with the fake.

The Model 3 does brake automatically when it detects an oncoming fake car, slowing to 3.2 miles per hour or slower before colliding with the fake car.

Tesla did not comment on the study. “The findings in the AAA report are being reviewed as part of our ongoing commitment to customer safety,” Hyundai said in a statement.

Subaru spokesman Dominick Infante said in an email that Subaru is studying the AAA test to understand the method and has no detailed response. He added that the automaker has revamped its EyeSight driver-assist system for the 2022 Forester.

AAA said the Subaru Forester it tested failed to detect a simulated bike rider crossing its path in five test runs. A Tesla Model 3 and a Hyundai Santa Fe did see and brake a fake cyclist crossing their path.

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(This story has not been edited by NDTV staff and was automatically generated from the syndicated feed.)

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